Trump’s Impeachment Trial Ends

President Donald J. Trump speaks with Secretary of Defense James Mattis and other senior leaders of the armed forces at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., Jan. 27, 2017. (DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jette Carr)

Staff Sgt. Jette Carr

President Donald J. Trump speaks with Secretary of Defense James Mattis and other senior leaders of the armed forces at the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., Jan. 27, 2017. (DOD photo by U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jette Carr)

Kyle Clauson, Centurion Staff

Donald Trump’s historical impeachment trial received a speedy acquittal on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress after the Senate rejected Democratic demands to summon witnesses. The impeachment inquiry against Trump was initiated by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sept. 24, 2019 after a whistleblower reported Trump’s abuse of presidency and presented his phone call with Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy as evidence.

In this call, Trump is accused of withholding military aid in order to pressure Zelenskiy into investigating one of his Democratic presidential opponent Joe Biden and his son, Hunter Biden to aid in his 2020 reelection.

After this was taken to impeachment court, Trump was impeached by The U.S. House of Representatives on Dec. 19, 2019.
On Feb. 5, 2020, theRepublican-controlled senate voted to acquit President Trump on both charges. For both charges, all 45 Democrat and two
Independent Senators voted guilty. For the charge of abuse of power, 52 Republican Senators voted not guilty, and one
Republican Senator, Mitt Romney, voted guilty. For the charge of obstruction of Congress, all 53 Republican Senators, including Mitt Romney, voted not guilty.
Students at Bucks have mixed opinions about this impeachment and how the Senate is handling everything as it’s played out before America’s eyes.
C.K. Davidson, 39, a media and advertising major from Oklahoma City, is for Trump’s impeachment and believes the Senate hasn’t “quite got there” and feels the trial is lacking “His side” or the point of view of this situation from Trump. She watched broadcasts of the impeachment trial on television in order to be informed and interpret the trial for herself.
“Even if the evidence isn’t considered incriminating, he was willing to abuse his power,” said Jason Fucanon, 18, a psychology major, from Levittown.
“Impeaching him is an important process – needs to prove validity in the American justice system.”
However, some students at Bucks feel indifferent to the ordeal. Taylor Obermann, 19, an environmental major from Philadelphia said she cannot be bothered to keep up with politics but believes that the process is taking too long.
“Senate is saying more than they’re doing” said Alexis Katcher, 20, a Fine Arts major from Allentown who was strongly for the impeachment. Katcher believes that history is repeating itself with the other two former impeachments. However, she also fears the result of Trump’s impeachment leaving America with his Vice President, Mike Pence.
However, opinions about this question diversify. Jaran Spada, 32, a medical billing and voting major from Hillsborough, NJ believes that Trump should not be impeached.
“Other presidents have done worse and they haven’t been impeached,” said Spada.
But many students fell on the same perspective of this situation, the government should be looking at the bigger picture.
“The impeachment is a waste of time and money,”said Daro Adame, 18, a cinema video major, from Doylestown “there are
bigger issues to focus on. like climate change.”
“There are bigger pictures to look at, the gun control controversy. It’s becoming a very scary time,” Said Maya Long, 18, a cinema video major, from Warminster. “The impeachment isn’t helping the polarization of America. The disagreements are intensifying.”
All of the students at Bucks fall on different points on the spectrum of political viewpoints. In modern democracies, everybody’s voice should be heard. Trump’s impeachment trial seems to be making small waves at Bucks.