Vice Presidential Overview: Mike Pence and Kamala Harris

Jacob Mairone

With some of the oldest presidential candidates in history running for office, one should not only educate themselves on who they are voting for, but their second in command as well. Mike Pence or Kamala Harris, which do you want speaking for the house?

When it comes to the environment, Harris cares. When it comes to gun freedom, Pence protects. Most Republican beliefs are shared by Pence while Democratic ones are shared by Harris.

If the economy is what you want your vice president to focus on, Mike Pence would be your candidate. When he was Indiana’s governor, the state enjoyed a $2 billion budget surplus with a triple-A credit rating. In 2012 he closed a deal giving a $1.1 billion give-back, the largest tax cut the state has ever seen.

If protecting a woman’s right to safe abortion is what you want of your candidate, Kamala Harris would be your candidate. One of Pence’s goals in office is to stop giving tax payer money to facilities that perform abortion. Harris, however, had always been a women’s activist and would dare to take away the opportunity.

Mike Pence went to Hanover College and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in history in 1981. He continued his education at Indiana University McKinney School of Law, where he would earn his Juris Doctor in 1986.

Kamala Harris graduated from Howard University. After getting her Bachelor of Arts degree in 1986, she went on to University of California Hastings College of Law and graduate with her Juris Doctor in 1989.

In 2017, Harris got elected into office as senator of California, being the first South Asian-senator. She also served as district attorney of San Francisco. Now, she’s running for vice president.

On the flip side of the politicized coin is Mike Pence. Before President Trump chose him as a running mate, he was the governor of Indiana. And before that, he was a Republican Conference Chairman.

In his early career, Pence ran for congress twice in 1988 and 1990, and he would lose both elections. Feeling ashamed about his line of attack ads, he wrote an essay titled “Confessions of a Negative Campaigner” where he vowed to choose the moral high ground from then on out.

Harris has a few published works, such as a piece in 2009 she wrote with Joan O’C Hamilton titled “Smart on Crime”. She also wrote a children’s book in 2019 called “Superheroes Are Everywhere” where she takes kids through her life to empower them. Also, in 2019 she wrote “The Truths We Hold: An American Journey” which was a campaign book.

Both candidates speak for many die-hard supporters and passionate groups of people who want to see real change, so make sure to vote smartly for the change you want to see happen as November approaches.

Vice President Micheal Pence poses for his official portrait at The White House, in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday, October 24, 2017. (Official White House Photo by D. Myles Cullen) (D. Myles Cullen)

 

U.S. Senate Photographic Studio-Renee Bouchard