How Students Are Adjusting to Remote Learning

How+Students+Are+Adjusting+to+Remote+Learning

Payton Schreier, Centurion Staff

Online Learning has taken a definite turn, and according to students, it may be for the worse. Many students are now being forced to stay home to complete their schooling, which can be damaging on many levels.

While students try their best to keep their productivity and concentration up at home, some have tried to get into a routine to try to make the day feel like a real school day. Some even dedicate certain areas in their house as their “school desk” or study area.

Many students have a specific room that they stay in while doing their online schooling and meetings. Brittney Grida, 19, psychology major says she studies at a desk in the corner of her room. “I keep my textbooks and notebooks in my desk along with my diffuser. I use my diffuser regularly to help me relax during school,” said Grida.

While most students do have a desk to work at and keep their school supplies organized, Rebekah Damon, 19, nursing major says she usually does her online school in her room or at her dining room table.

“If I’m in my room, I’ll do it on the floor because I don’t have a desk. I have all my pencils laid out with my notebooks as well. I use the dining room table as my locker basically,” said Damon.

Other students don’t have the space or the time to be as organized as they would normally be. William Youse, 19, computer science major feels that one advantage to having classes online is

that all his textbooks are online as well and he does not need to worry about the school work clutter. This advantage creates an easier way for students and teachers themselves to be more organized, as most of everything needed is through the computer.

On the other hand, online schooling has been negatively affecting some students. A balance between home life and classroom life has not been equal, and it has taken an effect on Youse, as he believes he’s not good at managing classwork and home life together.

“Whatever comes to mind first gets done first. After that, it’s just pure anxiety that takes over,” said Youse.

Online learning has caused increased stress on students and teachers as they are having a harder time reaching out to students for help, but teachers can no longer see or help their students directly. Many students are visual learners, and only being able to see what they need to learn through a screen without help can be very frustrating.

Some students are taking it better than others, as Damon stated she tries to time out her work so she have enough time to do everything.

“I give myself breaks in between as well. I’ll alternate my online classes as well to help myself focus and make it easier on myself,” said Damon. This can be beneficial for learning as switching up their routine could encourage more creativity and interest.

Online learning has seen both positives and negatives for students, and students themselves are pushing to see their degrees through no matter what the circumstances are.