Rising Gas Prices Hit Bucks Students in the Pocketbook

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Evan Lechowicz

Mixed emotions surround the college community as gas prices rise to record levels.

The oil companies around the world have been increasingly bumping up the price of oil, which is the main cause for the increase of gases prices. In recent times, there has been a tough time of recovering fresh oil from under the ground to keep our vehicles running. This has affected college students and how much they are spending each time.

Kailey Marsden, a communications major, spends the majority taking her classes online for Bucks as she is also a full-time worker.

“I just think that the country’s got to do what it must do, and it does affect me because I do drive a lot. Like when I go to Maryland or like anywhere else that is a long distance. But I do not give my car a full tank of gas every time I fill up.” Marsden said.

Marsden along with the other students, states that it would be easier if the inflation had never occurred as so they could have more money to save for when they need it.

“Of course, I want the gas prices to go down again. But it is honestly not too bad for me. I do not leave my tank to be completely empty before I fill it up. I fill it up when it is like half a tank, so it looks better in my bank account.” Marsden stated.

Along with Marsden, other online students are having trouble with keeping up to paying for gas at the rates they are at right now.

Maddie Pollock is studying Elementary Education through online classes as well through Bucks, and along with Marsden, agrees that it does take a toll of how much is being spent to fill up her car. Work is the main reason for her when she must travel.

“I do have to pay more for gas, which sucks, but there is really nothing that I can do about it. So, I just fill it up a half a tank and then go from there.” Pollock said.

All college students have difficulties with these prices, especially the students that attend in person classes as well.

Centurion writer, Tara Birnbaun, also a communications major is worried and stressed over how much is coming out of her wallet when she must fuel up.

“Well, I have spent almost double between traveling from home to school to work. And I am frustrated but hopefully it gets better soon!” Birnbaun said.

Students not just local to Newtown, but those of other campuses too are worried about the fuel prices that the travel to classes at Newtown can be costly.

Brooke Keller, an interpersonal psychology major, must travel from near the Perkasie campus, all the way down to Newtown to attend some classes. Which can take a good chunk of change from your pocket to put into your car.

“It is different than my situation a year ago when it was not really a problem to drive to Newtown. And now it is like you must pick up extra hours at work just to be able to afford gas.” Keller said.

She recently took a trip to Virginia to visit a friend but had thoughts on cancelling it. Saying she would not be able to afford the round trip with gas prices rising.

“For somebody that is going to college and also working, it’s not a good time to be paying upwards of forty dollars for half a tank of gas.” Keller also said.

Most of the students are hoping that gas prices return to where they were before the inflation happened. As too much money being spent to keep the car filled for students to attend their classes and jobs, it has really taken a toll on how much their pocketbooks and wallets have been pulled out.