Women Suffrage Panel Held At Bristol Campus

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Women Suffrage Panel Held At Bristol Campus

Kailyn Schaller, Centurion Staff

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Women and men from around the county gathered at the Lower Bucks campus on Constitution Day to celebrate 100 years of women’s suffrage.

After rallying and marching silently for almost a century, women were finally granted the right to vote in 1920. Attendees celebrated the peaceful movement that resulted in no loss of life.  At the event last Tuesday, past and current Bucks professors and one Bucks student hosted a lively panel discussion that was moderated by Bucks Political Science Professor William Pezza.

Panel members discussed the 19th amendment and women’s right to vote. Karen Platts, Bucks sociology professor and panel member said, “Women are becoming empowered, whether you like it or not.”
Platts added that she learned the importance of the women from suffrage from her grandmothers, who were not
able to vote until they were over 30 years old.

Panelist and Bucks student Shannon Walsh showed her support of women’s suffrage when she said, “Women are 50 percent of the population. We should have 50 percent of the voice.”
Walsh, hopes to educate women to act for what they believe in, and not just believe something will change.
The panel also included, Kathy Horwatt, a member of the League of Women Voters. Horwatt also serves as a Langhorne councilwoman.

Horwatt said that, “Change needs to be done.” Horwatt
added that she actively tries to help women understand how important it is for them to vote. Horwatt set up a table after the panel to encourage people to register to vote and inspired women to become involved in the political process. Jacqueline Marish a retired Bucks faculty member, spoke about the world of women’s rights towards equality during the panel. “Women aren’t seeking
power over someone, we’re seeking power with. That’s the difference,” said Marish.

Marish added that the women’s suffrage movement challenged the status quo.The fifth and final panelist was Jonice Arthur, of Bucks’ Lang and Lit department. Arthur has very strong beliefs in women’s rights, and intends to educate other women. The panel enlightened many people to raise awareness as to what is happening around them. As well as engaging people to get involved with voting and treat others equally.

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